Category Archives: Digital Field

Change Coming Our Way, Prepare Data Systems to Store Lateral’s Details.

Effectively, during the past decade, oil and gas companies have aimed their spotlight on efficiency. But should this efficiency be at the expense of data collection? Many companies are now realizing that it shouldn’t.

Consider the increasingly important re-fracturing effort.  It turns out, in at least one area, that only 45% of re-fracs were considered successful if the candidates were selected using production data alone.  However, if additional information (such as detailed completion, production, well integrity and reservoir characterization data) were also used a success rate of 80% was observed. See the snip below from the Society of Petroleum Engineer’s paper “SPE 134330” by M.C Vincent 2010).

Capture

Prepare data systems to store details, otherwise left in files.

Measurements while drilling (MWD), mud log – cuttings analysis and granular frac data are some of the data that can be collected without changing drilling or completion operations workflow and the achieved efficiency.  This information when acquired at the field will make its way to petrophysicists and engineers. Most likely it ends up in reports, folders and project databases.  Many companies do not think of this data storage beyond that.

We argue, however, to take advantage of this opportunity archival databases should also be expanded to store this information in a structured manner. This information should also funnel its way to various analytical tools. This practice will allow technical experts to dive straight into analyzing the wells  data instead of diverting a large portion of their time in looking for and piecing data together. Selecting the best re-frac candidates in a field will require the above well data and then some. Many companies are starting to study those opportunities.

Good data practices to consider

To maximize economic success from re-stimulation (or from first stimulation for that matter) consider these steps that are often overlooked:

  1. Prepare archival databases to specifically capture and retain data from lateral portions of wells. This data may include cuttings analysis, Mud log analysis, rock mechanics analysis, rock properties, granular frac data, and well integrity data.
  2. Don’t stop at archiving the data, but expose it to engineers and readily accessible to statistical and Artificial Intelligence tools. One of those tools is Tibco Spotfire.
  3. Integrate, integrate, integrate. Engineers depend on ALL data sources; internal, partners, third party, latest researches and media, to find new correlations and possibilities. Analytic platforms that can bring together a variety of data sources and types should be made available. Consider Big Data Platforms.
  4. Clean, complete and accurate data will integrate well. If you are not there yet, get a company that will clean data for you.

Quality and granular well data is the cornerstone to increasing re-frac success in horizontal wells and in other processes as well.  Collecting data and managing it well, even if you do not need it immediately, is an exercise of discipline but it is also a strategic decision that must be made and committed to from top down. Whether you are drilling to “flip” or you are developing for a long term. Data is your asset.

 

Capture The Retiring Knowledge

The massive knowledge that is retiring and about to retire in the next five years will bring some companies to a new low in productivity. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that 60% of job openings from 2010 to 2020 across all industries will result from retirees leaving the workforce, and it’s estimated that up to half of the current oil & gas workforce could retire in the next five to ten years.

For companies that do not have their processes defined and weaved into their everyday culture and systems — relying on their engineers and geoscientists knowledge instead — retirement of these professionals will cause a ‘brain drain,’ potentially costing these companies real down time and real money.

One way to minimize the impact of “Brain Drain” is by documenting a company’s unique technical processes and weaving them into training programs and, where possible, into automating technology. Why are process flows important to document? Process flow maps and documents are the geographical maps that give new employees the direction and the transparency they need, not only to ramp up a learning curve faster, but also to repeat the success that experienced resources deliver with their eyes closed.

For example, if a reservoir engineer decides to commission a transient test, equipment must be transported to location, the well is shut down and penetrated, pressure buildup is measured, data is interpreted, and BHP is extrapolated and Kh is calculated.
The above transient test process, if well mapped, would consist of: 1) Decisions 2) Tasks/ Activities 3) A Sequence Flow 4) Responsible and Accountable Parties 5) Clear Input and Output 6) and Possible Reference Materials and Safety Rules. These process components, when well documented and defined, allow a relatively new engineer to easily run the operation from start to end without downtime.

When documenting this knowledge, some of the rules will make its way in contracts and sometimes in technology enablers, such as software and workflow applications. The retiring knowledge can easily be weaved into the rules, reference materials, the sequence flow, and in information systems.

Documenting technical processes is one of the tools to minimize the impact of a retiring workforce. Another equally important way to capture and preserve knowledge is to ensure that data in personal network drives is accumulated, merged with mainstream information, and put in context early enough for the retiring workforce to verify its accuracy before they leave.

Processes and data  for a company make the foundation of a competitive edge, cuts back on rework and errors, and helps for quickly identifying new opportunities.

To learn more about our services on Processes or Data contact us at info@certisinc.com

Bring It On Sooner & Keep It Lifting Longer. Solutions To Consider For ESPs (Or Any Field Equipment)

Settled on average 6,000 feet below the surface, electrical submersible pumps (a.k.a ESPs) provide artificial lift for liquid hydrocarbons for more than 130,000 wells worldwide.
Installing the correct ESP system for the well, installing it precisely, and careful monitoring of the system is paramount to reducing the risk of a premature end to an ESP life cycle. But the increasingly long laterals of horizontal wells, along with rapid drilling in remote areas, is creating challenges for efficient operations and the ESP’s life span. Implementing the correct processes and data strategies will, undoubtedly, be the cheapest and fastest way to overcome some of the challenges.

1- Implement A Process Flow That Works, Break The Barriers

When a decision is made to install an ESP in a well, a series of actions are triggered: preparing specifications, arranging for power, ordering equipment, scheduling operations, testing, and finally installing it in a well, to state a few. These actions and decisions involve individuals from multiple departments within an organization as well as external vendors and contractors. These series of actions form a process flow that is sometimes inefficient and is drawn out, causing delays in producing revenue. In addition, sometimes processes fall short causing premature pump failures that interrupt production and raise operational costs.
Research of many industry processes shows communication challenges are one of the root causes for delays, according to LMA Consulting Group Inc. Furthermore, communication challenges increase exponentially when actions change hands and departments. A good workflow will cut across departmental barriers to focus on the ultimate goal of making sure Engineering, Procurement, Logistics, accounting, vendors, contractors and field operations all are on the same page and have a simple and direct means to communicate effectively. But more importantly, the workflow will allow for the team to share the same level of urgency and keep stakeholders well informed with the correct information about their projects. If you are still relying on phones, papers and emails to communicate, look for workflow technology that will bring all parties on one page.

A well-thought through workflow coupled with fit-for-purpose technology and data is critical, not only to ensure consistent successful results each time but also to minimize delays in revenue.

2- ESP Rented Or Purchased, It Does Not Matter… QA/QC Should Be Part Of Your Process

Although ESPs are rented and the vendor will switch out non-performing ones, ensuring that the right ESP is being installed for a well should be an important step of the operator’s process and procedures. Skipping this step means operators will incur the cost of shut downs and tempering of reservoir conditions that may otherwise be stabilized – not to mention exposure to risks each time a well is penetrated.
More importantly a thoughtful workflow ensures a safe and optimal life span for ESPs regardless of the engineers or vendors involved, especially in this age of a mass retiring of knowledge.

At today’s oil prices, interrupted production for a well of 1,000 barrels per day will cost an operator at least $250,000 of delayed revenue for a 5 day operation. Predictive and prescriptive analytics in addition to efficient processes can keep the interruption to the minimum if not delay it altogether.

3- Know Why And How It Failed Then Improve Your Processes – You Need The Data And The Knowledge

One last point in this blog: Because ESPs consist of several components, a motor, a pump, a cable, elastomer, etc… ESP failure can, therefore, be electrical, mechanical, thermal or fluid/gas composition. Capturing and understanding the reasons for a failure in a system to allow for effective data analysis provides insight that can be carried forward to future wells and to monitoring systems. Integrating this knowledge into systems such as predictive analysis or even prescriptive analytic to guide new engineers will have an effect on operator’s bottom-line. A few vendors in the market offer these kind of technology, weaving the right technology, data and processes to work in synergy is where the future is.

On how to implement these solutions please contact our team at info@certisinc.com.

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