Category Archives: Document Management

Capture The Retiring Knowledge

The massive knowledge that is retiring and about to retire in the next five years will bring some companies to a new low in productivity. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that 60% of job openings from 2010 to 2020 across all industries will result from retirees leaving the workforce, and it’s estimated that up to half of the current oil & gas workforce could retire in the next five to ten years.

For companies that do not have their processes defined and weaved into their everyday culture and systems — relying on their engineers and geoscientists knowledge instead — retirement of these professionals will cause a ‘brain drain,’ potentially costing these companies real down time and real money.

One way to minimize the impact of “Brain Drain” is by documenting a company’s unique technical processes and weaving them into training programs and, where possible, into automating technology. Why are process flows important to document? Process flow maps and documents are the geographical maps that give new employees the direction and the transparency they need, not only to ramp up a learning curve faster, but also to repeat the success that experienced resources deliver with their eyes closed.

For example, if a reservoir engineer decides to commission a transient test, equipment must be transported to location, the well is shut down and penetrated, pressure buildup is measured, data is interpreted, and BHP is extrapolated and Kh is calculated.
The above transient test process, if well mapped, would consist of: 1) Decisions 2) Tasks/ Activities 3) A Sequence Flow 4) Responsible and Accountable Parties 5) Clear Input and Output 6) and Possible Reference Materials and Safety Rules. These process components, when well documented and defined, allow a relatively new engineer to easily run the operation from start to end without downtime.

When documenting this knowledge, some of the rules will make its way in contracts and sometimes in technology enablers, such as software and workflow applications. The retiring knowledge can easily be weaved into the rules, reference materials, the sequence flow, and in information systems.

Documenting technical processes is one of the tools to minimize the impact of a retiring workforce. Another equally important way to capture and preserve knowledge is to ensure that data in personal network drives is accumulated, merged with mainstream information, and put in context early enough for the retiring workforce to verify its accuracy before they leave.

Processes and data  for a company make the foundation of a competitive edge, cuts back on rework and errors, and helps for quickly identifying new opportunities.

To learn more about our services on Processes or Data contact us at info@certisinc.com

More Shale Data Should Equal More Production, Unless Your Data is an Unusable Mess

As the U.S. overtakes Russia in Oil & Gas production because of its unconventional fields, new operators flood the industry. Inevitably, competition increases. The need for predictable and optimized well performance is greater than ever. The fastest route to optimization is quality data that can be used to understand unconventional fields better and drive the flow of operations efficiently.

However, as more data pours in, the cracks in many E&P companies’ data management systems are exposed. Geoscientists and engineers are left to make their own integrations and correlations between disperse systems and left digging through folders trying to find documents for knowledge.

Some of the trouble lies in the new methods of analyzing vast array of data that were not considered as prominent in conventional fields. For example, geoscientists break shale down by geology, geochemistry, and geomechanics, and engineers now look into fracs using microseimic lenses. While this data was used in conversional fields before, the stress on and ways of analyzing them is different now; new parameters have emerged as key measures such as TOC and brittleness. When it comes to shale fields, the industry is still learning from acquired data.

Well organized (and quality) information that is easily found and efficiently flows through internal departments and supplying vendors, not only will allow for faster reaction to operation’s needs & opportunities, it will turn into better strategy to increase EUR per well through better understanding of the reservoirs.

How you take care of your data directly impacts your engineers and geoscientists efficiency and the speed they can find good production opportunities. Fast and efficient is the name of the game when it comes to unconventional and competitive world.

It is not enough to provide a place to store new unconventional information and flow it to analytical systems, while those are the first steps they must fit into a holistic approach that takes unconventional integrated operational processes to the next level of efficiency.

Cut Search Time for Critical Documents from Days to Seconds. It is Time to Stop Digging in Folder Structures

It wasn’t long ago when geoscientists and petroleum engineers at one renowned oil company might spend days searching for documents.  “Searching” meant digging through folders (as many as 1500 of them!!), and discerning whether a “found” file was an official report or only an earlier draft.  To give you an idea, some critical HSE documents were buried as deeply as within the 13th   sub-folder (and then the correct version had to be selected!!)

Obviously in this situation emergency and critical decision cycle times were lengthened by the difficulty of finding the “buried” technical documents. The average time to locate and validate the accuracy of a document was calculated at 3 days.

When Certis arrived, the company’s folder system looked like an episode of “Hoarders”. The hoarder believes there is an organized system to his “madness”, but nobody else in the home can quite figure it out. Over the years, over 2,000,000 documents had been amassed at this location, and that total was growing fast. As engineers and geoscientists floated in and out, the system fell victim to hundreds of interpretations. Unlike the hoarder’s goods, these documents contained vital information that accumulated years of studies and billions of dollars of data acquisitions. Years of knowledge, buried, literally.

In today’s competitive and fast pace operations in our Oil and Gas industry, data is accumulating faster than ever and decisions must be made faster than ever by petro-professionals that are already overextended.  Compounded with the fact that a large portion of the knowledge is within a workforce that may soon retire means that Oil and Gas companies that want to stay exceptional and competitive cannot afford to waste petro-professionals time hunting for critical records.

So, how do you get to a point where your organization can locate the right document instantly?  We believe it is all about Processes, Technology and People put in place (a cliché but so true)

When Certis completed this project, the technical community could locate their documents within few seconds using “google-like” search. More importantly they were (and are now) able to locate the “latest” version and trust it. The solution had to address 3 elements, people, processes and technology.

The final solution meant collapsing folders from 2000 down to 150, using a DRM system without burdening the technical community and implementing complete processes with a service element that ensured sustainability.

Centralized, standardized and institutionalized systems and processes were configured to take full advantage of the taxonomy and DRM systems. Once the ease of use and the value were demonstrated to the people, buy-in was easy to get.

Technology advances faster than our ability to keep up. This is especially true when working with professionals whose focus is (and should be!) on their projects, not on data management. We had to break the fear of change by proving there is a better way to work that increases efficiency and makes employee’s lives easier.

Legacy Documents, what do you do with them?

Because solving operational issues at the field requires access to complete historical information, exhuming technical legacy documents, physical or electronic, from their buried locations was the next task.

On this project the work involved prioritizing, locating, removing duplicates, clustering, and tagging files with standard meta-data. With a huge number of files accumulated in network drives and library rooms, a company must keep an eye on “cost/ benefit” ratio. How to prioritize and how to tag technical files become two key success factors to designing a cost-effective migration project.

This topic can go on and on since there were so many details that made this project successful. But that may be for another post.

Read more about Certis and about our oil and gas DRM services http://ow.ly/oRQ5f